Softcover Binding or Perfect Binding

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Here is our softcover or perfect binder in action!  We print and bind a wide range of books for schools, self publishers, and events.  In this video we are binding Yearbooks for a local middle school.  Our Sulby 1250, first grinds the spine for proper glue adhesion, then it goes through a hot melt glue that applies to the spine and 1/16″ on the first and last pages, or side glue.  Then it loads a cover, scoring it while entering the machine, lastly it put the cover on at the nipping table.  Our machine is rated at 1250 books per hour!  After they are bound, we take it to our massive cutter to trim the top side and bottom, or what is known as a 3 knife trim.  At the end, we end up with books that are suitable for store shelves, libraries, or for sale online!

Die Cutting Tabs

We normally cut tabs on our Scott Tab Cutter.  But when we cut 10,000, we use our letterpress!  And you can see why, so much faster than hand feeding one at a time!  This is our Miehle 50x Cylinder Letterpress cutting 8.5×14.5 3 Bank tabs at roughly 1000 per hour!

Services Offered

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We offer a wide range of services that include all options of bindery, color and black and white printing, die cutting and all sorts of marking materials to help your business grow.  If you can’t find what you are looking for on the site, please just shoot us an email to info@denverprintandbind.com, and we can help you with your project.

Printing Terminology Used on this site

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Printers use a lot of terminology that can be confusing to understand if you are not in the business.  Here is a list of some of the terminology that we use to describe our products.

  • 1/0= Black Print on One Side of the page
  • 1/1= Black Print on both sides of the page
  • 4/0= Color Print on One Side of the page
  • 4/4= Color Print on both Sides of the page
  • Full Bleed= When the image goes off the edge of the page.  Most printers can not print off the edge, the way that this is achieved is to print on a larger size piece of paper and then cutting the page down in bindery.  On most applications, 1/8″ extra on all 4 edges is required to produce the job properly.  Please keep in mind that you still want to have a margin of 1/4″ away from the edge with important content, such as words, so that we don’t cut though that part and still have a good look to it.
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